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On A More Personal Note


It has been a little while since I wrote my last entry, but I promise I have good reason: my family and I have finally moved back to Maryland!  The last year has been absolutely crazy, and while this may not seem like a huge event, for us it is.  My wife is from Maryland, and I lived here for almost 4 years before getting a promotion last year and being moved to Philly.  After losing my job in February and starting my own business in March, things have been very tough on many fronts, so this is a much-needed change back to an area where we want to be.

As I have finally been able to sit and gather my thoughts and think about what my next article should be about, I came upon a blog by Roger O. Crockett called White Executives Should Head to the ‘Hood.  At first glance, this article sounded interesting, potentially politically incorrect, and possibly crazy, but once I read it I really thought about myself and my own experiences.  The premise behind the article was that many more executives should take the time to get out in to the “‘hood” and take some lessons from the people there, as well as use it to help bridge the gap in communication and understanding of others situations.  I can relate, and think about this quite often.

I grew up in a town that had the rural areas, as well as some of the city lifestyle.  My parents separated very early on (before I could remember) which made me somewhat strange in a time when that certainly wasn’t the norm, at least for everyone else.  I had a step-dad who didn’t really want much to do with me because I wasn’t really his child, and he let me know that physically, emotionally, and mentally through degradation and abuse.  We didn’t have a lot of money, and I was always told that if I wanted to go to college I was going to have to figure something out on my own, because we just didn’t have the money and never would.  I was gifted intellectually, but didn’t want to be branded a nerd and get picked on any more than I already did for not having name brand clothes, being a big kid, and being smart.  Because of this, I downplayed my intelligence in school, and did just what I needed to get by.

My Mom owned and ran a print shop where I was fortunate enough to gain quite a bit of business experience, as well as my grandparents owned their own concrete servicing company (building and servicing concrete plants internationally).  Even with all of this going on, I managed to get in to the wrong crowds and spiraled down very quickly from about age 13 to age 21.  I became involved in drugs, drinking, and anything else that I could get in to, simply trying to find my way.  I don’t blame anyone for my mistakes, and know that I have myself to blame for my decisions.  After a failed marriage, receiving an Other Than Honorable discharge from the US Navy, and essentially losing everything that I had gained up until that point, I knew it was time for a change.  At the age of 21 I made the decision that I wanted more than what I had and what I saw myself as ever having on the path that I was on; I knew that I should and could have more.  I left everything I had left, and where I was, and moved back in with family and started over.  That was about 7 years ago.

I still don’t have a college degree, but I have had a tremendous amount of experience over the years, both in business and in life.  I have accumulated education over the years, and look towards the future and getting a formal education, but now it’s because I find what I do interesting and I want to learn as much about it as I possibly can.  So why am I even telling this?  How many people do you think ever ask about, or even care about, my life experience or my intelligence past my formal education?  Believe me when I say very few.  I have had recruiters tell me outright that my resume looks great and my experience is impressive, but I must have a Bachelor’s, no exception.  It makes me wonder how many bright, talented people out there are missing out on opportunities and how many organizations are missing out on their next bright start because of this thought process?

Because of my history, I have an appreciation for everything that I have, and loyalty almost to a fault.  My work ethic is above reprieve and I am proud of that.  My passion for what I do is just about second to none.  I have a diverse understanding and appreciation of life and the people in it.  Those are the good traits.  I also know that because of my history, I am more direct in my communications than most people like, and generally speak matter-of-factly.  I also know that I tend to take on more responsibility than I should at times, and allow myself to get overburdened.  I strive to continuously receive praise and recognition for my work, and to make a real impact.  How many of you would want an employee that exhibits these traits? 

How many companies are missing out on these opportunities?  Which is more important, someone who has the passion and wants to learn and grow and is excited about it or someone who comes in and does the job and has a sense of entitlement, or does it simply because that is what they are “supposed to do”?  I’m not saying that this is specific to any one generation, ethnicity, age, sex, religion, or otherwise; what I’m saying is that organizations need to put more time and effort in to finding the people, like myself, who once given the opportunity can and will strive for excellence and helping the organization that they belong to.  I have seen it time and again, as I am sure that many of you have as well.  As I say many times, everything in your organization is impacted by your human capital; are you diversifying your portfolio enough, or are you playing it safe with degrees and credentials that will get steady results and obedience?  Could your organization use an injection of innovation, creativity, and passion?  I encourage you to give an opportunity to some people whom you might otherwise overlook (a measured risk of course), and see what kinds of results you get.

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